God Is Gone Up

by Finzi | Recorded at Bury Parish Church 12 May 2012. Gerald Finzi's fame probably rests most securely on his songs - particularly is miraculous settings to Thomas Hardy - and on the bittersweet Clarinet Concerto written under the shadow of the leukaemia that was to claim him in his mid-fifties. The choral music presents a rather different Finzi - here he is in celebratory mood, extrovert and full of joy, revelling in the extravagant images of the text.

A Litany

by William Walton | Recorded at Bury Parish Church 12 May 2012. Sir William Walton's precocious gift is nowhere better illustrated than in the short anthem he wrote as a fifteen-year-old chorister as Christ Church Cathedral School in Oxford. The expressive dissonances anticipate the opening of Balshazzar's Feast ( By the waters of Babylon...) written in 1931.

Veni, Veni Emanuel

Recorded at St Mary's Church Stockport 24 November 2012. Anon 13th Century, "O come, O come, Emmanuel! Redeem they captive Israel, That into exile drear is gone, Far from the face of God's dear Son, Rejoice! rejoice! Emmanuel Shall come to thee, O Israel."

Hymnus Ante Somnum

by Jeffrey Lewis | Recorded at Bangor Cathedral April 2003. Hymnus Ante Somnum is a some what thought provoking work. The aim of any serious composer is, in some way, to alter our perception of time, at it's simplest level by imposing a rhythmic or formal structure upon it. Imagine the moment just prior to walking, however, where an external event seems to expand and become incorporated into a dream scenario - that is the illusion so magically suggested by the music of Jeffrey Lewis. It is the extension of a single point of stillness into a line, measurable in time, but experienced outside it.

Hymnus Ante Somnum (Chant 2)

by Jeffrey Lewis | Recorded at Bangor Cathedral April 2003. Hymnus Ante Somnum is a some what thought provoking work. The aim of any serious composer is, in some way, to alter our perception of time, at it's simplest level by imposing a rhythmic or formal structure upon it. Imagine the moment just prior to walking, however, where an external event seems to expand and become incorporated into a dream scenario - that is the illusion so magically suggested by the music of Jeffrey Lewis. It is the extension of a single point of stillness into a line, measurable in time, but experienced outside it.

Hymnus Ante Somnum (Chant 3)

by Jeffrey Lewis | Recorded at Bangor Cathedral April 2003. Hymnus Ante Somnum is a some what thought provoking work. The aim of any serious composer is, in some way, to alter our perception of time, at it's simplest level by imposing a rhythmic or formal structure upon it. Imagine the moment just prior to walking, however, where an external event seems to expand and become incorporated into a dream scenario - that is the illusion so magically suggested by the music of Jeffrey Lewis. It is the extension of a single point of stillness into a line, measurable in time, but experienced outside it.

Hymnus Ante Somnum (Chant 5)

by Jeffrey Lewis | Recorded at Bangor Cathedral April 2003. Hymnus Ante Somnum is a some what thought provoking work. The aim of any serious composer is, in some way, to alter our perception of time, at it's simplest level by imposing a rhythmic or formal structure upon it. Imagine the moment just prior to walking, however, where an external event seems to expand and become incorporated into a dream scenario - that is the illusion so magically suggested by the music of Jeffrey Lewis. It is the extension of a single point of stillness into a line, measurable in time, but experienced outside it.

Hymnus Ante Somnum (Chant 11)

by Jeffrey Lewis | Recorded at Bangor Cathedral April 2003. Hymnus Ante Somnum is a some what thought provoking work. The aim of any serious composer is, in some way, to alter our perception of time, at it's simplest level by imposing a rhythmic or formal structure upon it. Imagine the moment just prior to walking, however, where an external event seems to expand and become incorporated into a dream scenario - that is the illusion so magically suggested by the music of Jeffrey Lewis. It is the extension of a single point of stillness into a line, measurable in time, but experienced outside it.

Bethlehem Down

Composed by Peter Warlock, was one of the carols performed at St. Peter's Church in Oughtrington at our Christmas Concert in December 2008.

I Saw A Fair Maiden

Composed by Peter Warlock and is one of his delightful set of Six Carols, again recorded at St Peter's Church in December 2008.

Il Est Ne, Le Divin Enfant

Recorded in Macclesfield on November 5th 2007, this peice has a beautiful drone in the Tenor and Bass sections with melodic answer in Soprano and Alto sections.